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Top Of The Best Shot Glasses Reviewed In 2018

Last Updated September 1, 2018
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Adrian HoffmanHi! My name is Reginald Meyer. After putting in 50+ hours of research and testing, I made a list of the best Shot Glasses of 2018 and explained their differences and advantages.

In this article, I will be categorizing the items according to their functions and most typical features. I hope that my Top 10 list will provide you great options in buying the right fit for you.

 

 

Feel free to explore the podium, click on the pictures to find out more.

 

 

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You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Shot Glasses by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Mug Shots – 6 Piece Shot Glass Set of Famous Gangster Mugshots – Comes in a Colorful Gift Box

 
Mug Shots - 6 Piece Shot Glass Set of Famous Gangster Mugshots - Comes in a Colorful Gift Box
Pros
This handsome set of shot glasses features mug shots of six of America’s most notorious gangsters. So now you can down a bourbon with Pretty Boy Floyd, a Sambuca with Lucky Luciano, a schnapps with Bugsy Siegel, or a Jell-o shot with John Dillinger. Each shot glass has a front and profile mug shot of a famous gangster, along with his rap sheet.
 

 

№2 – Good Idea Bad Idea Engraved Fluted Shot Glass

 
Good Idea Bad Idea Engraved Fluted Shot Glass
Pros
Measures: 2.31″H x 1.93″ diameter
1.5 oz capacity
Engraved and Made in USA
 

 

№3 – Gmark 2-Ounce Heavy Base Shot Glass Set, Whiskey Shot Glass 12-Pack GM2026

 
Gmark 2-Ounce Heavy Base Shot Glass Set, Whiskey Shot Glass 12-Pack GM2026
Pros
Set of 12pcs high quality shot glasses
1-3/4 by 1-3/4 by 3-1/2 inches and holding 2 ounces each
Sleek European stylish design for bar collections
 

 

On The Rock Glass With Ice Ball Maker

For those who like their whiskey on the chilled side, this rocks glass is the perfect option. Each set comes with a silicone mold that, when filled and frozen, forms a single solid ice ball that outlasts regular ice cubes. The glass itself also features a shape conducive for the ice ball, allowing the sipper to swirl with ease minus the worry of spillover.

Corkcicle Whiskey Wedge

The warm whiskey burn can end up deterring many from enjoying one of the world’s finest spirits. Here’s a fantastic solution to that obstacle. The Whiskey Wedge is an artful way to chill but not water down the dram, as the wedge is designed to melt at a much lower pace than floating ice cubes.

Orrefors ‘Intermezzo’ Old-Fashioned Glass

Truly one-of-a-kind, each Intermezzo glass features a drop of color in the stem that distinguishes the glass from anything else you’re ever encountered. It’s made from crystal, is dishwasher safe, and designed by Erika Lagerbielke; add a touch of modern to the bar.

Riedel VINUM Whiskey Glasses

World-famous glassmakers produce this fine whiskey vessel that’s made of 2percent lead crystal for enhanced clarity, a capacity of seven ounces, and features a short stem and elongated thistle-shaped body in order to enhance the characteristics of the whiskey for every drinker’s enjoyment.

Matterhorn Glass

If you’re more of a dreamer than a doer check out these Matterhorn glasses inspired by the famous mountain in the Alps. Each glass is crafted out of crystal and looks quite impressive when filled with a dram of your favorite whiskey. And while you may never actually hike the famed mountain, at least now you can admire it from afar.

Norlan Glass

Get your hands on this glass that was just given the green light for production after a successful Kickstarter campaign. It’s a transparent, double-walled sipping vessel formed from a specific glass-blowing technique. The Norlan weighs in at 12grams and features a faceted base to eliminate fingerprints on the bowl.

Dorset Double Old Fashioned Glasses

Getting its name from the photogenic county on England’ southern coastline, each Dorset Double is composed of lead-crystal and reflects light in all directions thanks to the hand-cut fluting on the side of the glass. Pick up a set of these and any cocktail or dram will be presented in a fantastic manner. iittala Ultima Thule

Classy. That’s the one adjective that comes to mind at first glance. Its design produces a more translucent appearance for the glass and even though they may look too delicate to wash after consumption, you’ll be please to know each piece is dishwasher safe. iittala Aarne Double Old Fashioned Glass

Looking a bit like a shot glass rather and your typical Old Fashioned, the wide mouth facilitates a fuller sip capacity without any drip and the whole piece is made from mouth-blown glass, designed by Goran Hongell. Its mid-century design is one of elegance and simplicity, marrying it well with any number of fine whiskeys.

Library Hand-Cut Double Old Fashioned Glass

Suited for a cool winter’s night next to a warm fireplace, the rough-hewn glass makes this vessel a fantastic addition to your wet bar. It’s crafted from molded blown soda glass, boasts a hand-cut design, and comes in a set of six that also includes a shot glass, highball, wine glass, flute, and martini glass as well.

Ox Horn Double Old Fashioned Whiskey Tumbler

If you’re not satisfied with drinking an after-hours pour out of glass then look to this Ox Horn built tumbler. Built from ethically-sourced horns, it hosts ounces of capacity, is polished to a bright finish, and handmade in England. Easily a more macho option for those whiskey drinkers out there.

Blade Runner Whiskey Glasses

If Harrison Ford drank whiskey, which we’re sure he does, he would certainly own a pair of these Blade Runner glasses. They feature a square design with diagonal cuts at the angles and were modeled after the exact same tumblers used by Deckard himself in the movie.

The Lowball Machined Whiskey Tumbler

As a hard working individual you appreciate the time and effort it takes to get something done correctly. The Lowball was conceived with this notion in mind and is crafted for that special moment when the day is done. The interior features CNC Lathe contours to create a perfect hourglass snifter profile and the tumbler boasts optimized geometry so it fits perfectly in your hand.

Forward

Another original product from Fred & Friends, Doomed is a Crystal Skull shot glass that holds ounces of your favorite beverage, when filled the liquid inside the skulls seems to float inside of the rim of the glass. The glass looks amazin

Factors to consider when purchasing shot glasses

Mason Jar Shot Glass-this is a mini replica of the mason jar and holds up to 2.ounces of alcohol, which is just enough to start off a drinking day.

Cool Shooter Ice Shot Glass-These have shot glasses made from ice. After taking shots, you have an option of eating the ice or letting it melt away. Although most people prefer eating the shot glasses.

Shot-shell XL Whiskey Shot Glass-This shot glass is crafted from a heavy duty stainless steel material. The glass holds 4.ounces of liquor and it can surely stand up against the toughest liquor glasses

What to know before you go.

Shot glasses are not only meant for drinking; they can also be used for decorations, making candles, playing games, holding tea bags and even they can be given out as gifts. Before buying shot glasses always consider the occasion, your long-term users, and the prices. Also, the material used to make shot glasses also come in handy since not all materials are good for consumption. Features to Consider

Capacity-one should always consider the capacity of shot glasses before buying them. Deserts and individuals who like mixing their liquor with other drinks should opt for larger sizes compared to people who take their alcohol without mixing

The design-the design of your shot glass matters. Stylish designs always tend to stand out from common models. This factor is why most companies and restaurants have custom made shot glasses.

Basic Shot Glasses

Everyone, whether a drinker or not, is familiar with this style of shot glasses. This is a just a traditional, tapered shot glass and they are typically anywhere from 1.2- 1.ounces in size, with 1.ounces being the most common size for a basic shot glass since a shot is typically this amount. They can be made from any type of material. If you are looking for a basic shot glass with your logo on it, you can’t go wrong with this option. These are by far the most popular choice.

Tall Shot Glasses

Nightclubs are known for serving shots in tall shot glasses because the appearance of the tall shots makes it seem like they hold a lot more liquor than they actually do. These are also considered to be a little classier than a basic shot glass, so along with the appearance of much more liquor, higher prices can be charged for shots in a tall shot glass. Sometimes, these are also called shooters, not to be confused with the test tube style shooters. Most tall shot glasses hold about ounces of alcohol. The tall glasses are much easier to spill due to their height, so if you are concerned with spillage, than look for the other styles. If you want a traditional look that stands out just a bit more than a basic shot glass, this is your pick.

Glow and Light-Up Shot Glasses

These light-up shot glasses are for those who want to get down and dirty and throw a party. These are more popular for the younger, but legal, generations. Some of the glowing shot glasses are meant for a one-time use and once activated, they glow for approximately 4-hours. Others, such as the LED light-up shot glasses actually have an on/off switch and are battery powered, so they are reusable and last much longer. Your available budget will determine which option you go with. This light-up style certain attracts a lot of attention to your logo that is printed on the side and radiating to all the surrounding party people.

Glass Shot Glasses

Of course, glass is what comes to mind when most people think of shot glasses, after all, they are called, “glasses.” Glass has a great, heavy feel that is popular among “professional shot takers.” The heavier the glass used to make the shot glass, the higher the cost of the shot glass. If you are looking for upscale, a heavy glass shot glass will do the trick. With glass, you can choose from clear or a colored glass option. Other choices include traditional tapered, fluted, and square glasses. Obviously with glass products, they are breakable, so if you are concerned with breakage, check out some of the other options below. However, if you want traditional, glass shot glasses are a great choice.

Acrylic Shot Glasses

Even though acrylic is a type of plastic, we separate it into its own category because of the major differences in appearance between acrylic and “typical” plastic. Acrylic is a clear plastic that closely resembles glass. From a distance, it is hard to determine whether the material is actually glass or acrylic. Acrylic commonly comes in many colors so you can compliment your company colors. Many of the LED and light up shot glasses are made of acrylic. Since acrylic is very light-weight and very durable, acrylic shot glasses may be the clear choice, if you anticipate your crowd getting a bit rough and are worried about having glass shot glasses around your party.

Plastic Shot Glasses

It is well-known that glass is much more expensive to manufacture than plastic, hence, the creation of plastic shot glasses. This lower cost material allows for bulk purchases of shot glasses to made by companies who can’t otherwise afford the glass option. Often you will find many of the novelty shot glasses and the glow and light-up shot glasses are made out of plastic. You can choose from either disposable plastic or reusable plastic. Plastic is durable and lower cost, so it is the perfect choice for those on a tight budget.

Ceramic Shot Glasses

Ceramic has become a very popular alternative material for shot glasses. The smooth finish on ceramic shot glasses gives these an elegant look, an upscale feel, and many options for color combinations to go along with your company colors. Just like when shopping for ceramic coffee mugs, it is cheaper in cost to go with a white ceramic color over a colored ceramic. This style most commonly is available for basic shot glasses. A great characteristic of ceramic is the heavy weight, which makes these more of a commodity for recipients. The heavier weight creates a higher sense of value. If you want upscale, a heavy weight, and great color choices, ceramic may be the best fit for you.

Stainless Steel

If you are looking for a timeless material, you may want to think about going with stainless steel shot glasses. Stainless steel has an upscale look and is very durable. For even more visual appeal, go with the stainless steel/acrylic mix options. The stainless steel part adds the durability and the acrylic adds color to the shot glasses. This material will be higher priced than many of the other materials. These steel shot glass are so durable, they will practically last forever and continue to promote your company for decades.

Overall, you can’t make a bad decision when buying shot glasses with your company logo. The shot glasses will advertise for your company during and after your party. Fun is guaranteed if shots are involved, and when marketing and fun are mixed together, your company benefits by strongly reinforcing your company brand. Now that you know the various options for promotional shot glasses, you can make a better decision about which shot glasses will work best for your needs.

Preheat the oven to 37degrees F.

Unwrap the candies. Place an 8-cavity round shot glass silicone mold on a baking sheet. Arrange candies in the bottom of each mold. Arrange a second layer of candies on top of the first, staggering them between the candies on the bottom. Top each with additional candies in the same manner.

Transfer to the oven and bake until all the candies are melted, to 1minutes. Remove from the oven and use a spoon to tap the candies to eliminate any air bubbles or gaps. Allow to cool and set at room temperature. Remove from the molds and serve as shot glasses with drinks of your choice.

Restaurant Drinkware

We have written guides about proper table settings and restaurant dinnerware. Now it’s time for a guide about restaurant drinkware. Often taken for granted, the right drinkware can set your establishment apart from the rest! Choose drinkware with a little flair for your bar for added appeal or classy Crystallin for your sit down restaurant. This guide will help you to determine which types of drinkware are best for your food service business and which types are not the perfect fit.

Materials

The drinkware or glassware your restaurant puts on the table can be made of several different materials. The following are the most common materials used in drinkware production:

SAN – Also known as styrene acrylonitrile resin. This is a durable plastic that can withstand boiling so it is dishwasher safe. It can be clear or come in a variety of colors. SAN is also BPA free.

Polycarbonate – Polycarbonate is a plastic that is durable but may scratch easy. Polycarbonate can be very clear and can also come in a variety of colors, much like SAN. Polycarbonate can resist higher temperatures but because of the use of BPA in it’s manufacturing process is not the best choice for hot beverages.

Glass – Glass is heavier in weight than plastic and may feel better in your customer’s hand. Glass is a classic option for drinkware but can be easily broken when dropped or subjected to temperature shock.

Tempered Glass – Tempered glass, also known as safety glass, is strengthened through thermal or chemical treatment. Tempered glass will not break as easily as untempered glass, making it a great choice for bar glasses that are commonly subjected to “frosting. When tempered glass does break, it breaks into safer, smaller pieces rather than large shards.

Crystal – Classic crystal, also known as Lead Glass, is glass that is traditionally made with potash (salts) and lead. Known for looking much better than traditional glass, Crystal has been used for glassware as early as 161Although deemed safe for use, thorough washing before use is recommended to reduce the chances of lead leaching. Because of this, storing beverages for longer periods of time is not advised.

Crystallin – Also known as “Cystal Glass, Crystallin is the lead free variety of Crystal. Barium, potassium, and zinc are used instead of lead, making it a safer choice for those concerned with traditional Crystal’s lead content. Like Crystal, Crystallin’s appearance is favored over glass.

Porcelain – Porcelain is a type of ceramic material that is very hard and usually comes in white. Also called “China. Porcelain can be more durable than traditional glass but is known to chip.

Pitcher

Decanter is commonly used to dispense beverages and not as a drinking vessel. Pitchers/decanters are most commonly used in bars and sit down restaurants. Pitchers and Decanters are most commonly made of SAN, Glass, or Polycarbonate. (also known as Old Fashioned glasses) are usually found in bars for use with alcoholic beverages. Rocks glasses typically come in glass but have more recently been made in break resistant SAN. beer mugs are also more commonly found in bars or sit down restaurants with a beer service. Because pilsners and tankards are typically frosted for maintaining a colder beverage, tempered glass is usually the material of choice.

The basic home bar

Our favorite essential home barware. Back row, from left to right: Umami Mart’s Seamless Plain Mixing Glass, OXO Steel Cocktail Strainer, Usagi Cobbler Shaker, Koriko Weighted Shaking Tins, Fletcher’s Mill’s 11-inch Muddler,  and Cocktail Kingdom’s Teardrop Barspoon. Front row, left to right, Chef’n’s FreshForce Citrus Juicer and OXO Good Grips ¼-cup Mini Angled Measuring Cup. Photo: Kate Milford

You don’t need a lot of equipment to make great drinks at home. If you’re just getting into cocktails, you might start with a shaker, a jigger, and a strainer. More advanced mixologists should consider investing in a good mixing glass, spoon, muddler, and citrus press. Here’s a rundown of what you’ll need, depending on the types of drinks you like.

Shaker: Perhaps the most basic bar tool, this is used to shake cocktails that include mixers (such as juice, dairy, or egg) to blend flavors from the various spirits and ingredients and to chill, aerate, and dilute the drink. Although shakers can be subdivided further, the Boston and cobbler styles are the two main setups you’ll see. Most professionals use Boston shakers, which are comprised of large and small cups that fit together. Both cups are usually metal, but sometimes bartenders use a pint glass for the smaller one. A Boston shaker requires a little more finesse to connect and shake, and needs a separate strainer. Cobbler-style shakers, on the other hand, are more popular with home bartenders. Generally, they separate into three pieces: a canister, a lid with a strainer, and a cap to cover up the holes. These have a tendency to leak, but they don’t require a separate strainer.

Mixing glass: Cocktails made entirely of alcohol (or perhaps very light mixers), such as a martini or Manhattan, should be stirred. Although you can stir in something like a pint glass, a mixing glass with straight sides, a heavy base, and a pour spout works far better (and looks nicer). Mixing glasses are traditionally made of glass rather than metal; glass is a better insulator and allows the guest to watch the cocktail being made.

Bar spoon: Used for preparing stirred cocktails, a bar spoon has a long handle for reaching the bottom of a mixing glass. A good spoon can also scoop up garnishes.

Muddler: This tool smashes herbs, fruit, or sugar cubes for making cocktails like a mojito. All manner of muddlers exist, from heavy plastic cylinders to artisan-made wooden objets d’art to the disk-shaped end of a bar spoon.

Citrus press: Most of the bartenders we spoke with recommended a hand press for citrus-based cocktails. Hand-held citrus reamers tend to be difficult to use; electric and manual presses produce more juice than the average home bartender needs. A hand press, which has a cup for the cut half of citrus and levered handles, will more easily produce the right amount of juice for a couple of drinks.

Our favorite Boston shaker, the Koriko Weighted Shaking Tins, has better balance and a more easily breakable seal than other shakers we tried. Photo: Kate Milford

If you want a cobbler shaker

This all-in-one shaker and strainer will be easier to use for novice mixologists. It has less of a tendency to leak than other cobbler-style shakers, and it feels more solidly built.

Although pro bartenders generally prefer and recommend two-piece Boston shakers, the style does take a separate strainer (and a little more finesse) to work with. If you want an all-in-one solution, we like the Usagi Cobbler Shaker. Chris Tunstall recommends a cobbler shaker for beginners because you don’t need a separate strainer, but these shakers also have a terrible reputation for leaking. Several of our experts criticized them for lids that get stuck and poor built-in strainers with holes that are inefficient, too big, or that drip. The Usagi is the only cobbler shaker we’ve found that doesn’t leak while shaking and that came apart easily.

We tested the quality of the built-in strainer of the cobbler shakers by checking how easy it was to remove the cap and by filling the shaker with small shards of ice and pieces of herbs. Photo: Emily Han

Pull Quote

Our experts cautioned against buying expensive shakers at fancy kitchen stores (they are designed more for looks than functionality), as well as cheaply-made shakers often sold at liquor stores.

The Usagi feels heavier and more solid than Oggi’s Marilyn Tall and Slim Cocktail Shaker, our top cobbler pick from 201(which, according to some of our readers, also has some leaking problems). All three parts of the Usagi shaker remained snug while shaking, yet the parts weren’t so tight that it was tough to break the seal. We also appreciated that the Usagi shaker has a little ergonomic indentation in the cap where you can put your index finger while shaking. For those who care, this shaker also looks nice and classic.

Our experts cautioned against buying expensive shakers at fancy kitchen stores (they are designed more for looks than functionality), as well as cheaply-made shakers often sold at liquor stores.

Jeffrey Morgenthaler praises the Koriko Weighted Shaking Tins, while Robert Hess recommends both the Koriko tins and Usagi Cobbler Shaker models (with preference given to the Boston style).

Our mixing glass pick

This glass has a more stable base and better pour spout than others we looked at. Its understated lines will also complement a variety of styles better than etched versions.

All of the glasses we tried were comparable in size and durability, but the Umami Mart’s wide, heavy base gives it more stability; it does not tip or move around, making it one of the easiest glasses we tried for stirring liquid and ice with a bar spoon. Cocktail Kingdom’s Seamless Yarai Mixing Glass, by comparison, didn’t sit flat on the counter and wobbled with stirring, as did the lightweight French press carafes we tried.

An OXO Hawthorne strainer snugly fit the mouths of most of the mixing glasses we tested. But the spout on the Umami Mart glass is smaller and more precise than those on Cocktail Kingdom’s Yarai Mixing Glass and the W&P Mixing Glass, making straining the drink into a cocktail glass a more foolproof affair. Cocktail Kingdom’s Seamless Yarai Mixing Glass has a similar pour spout and is few dollars cheaper, but its tendency to wobble knocked it out of the running.

Spout size and shape can affect how easy it is to strain and pour from a mixing glass. We preferred the more narrow spout of the Umami Mart glass, far right. Photo: Emily Han

Though it looks delicate, the Umami Mart is made of weighty glass that’s less likely to break than something like a French press beaker. Durability is important “because you’re definitely going to break your mixing glass at some point,” says Jeffrey Morgenthaler. “It’s just a matter of when, and a heavier glass is going to live longer than a lighter one.”

At 550 mL (or 18.5ounces), enough for two drinks, we think the Umami Mart is just right for most home cocktail making. Mixing glasses generally range from 1ounces (480 mL) to 3ounces (one L), but we only tested those of comparable size to the Umami Mart glass. Morgenthaler notes that “a good mixing glass has to be large enough to hold the drink, and a good amount of ice. Smaller is definitely not better here.”

Also great for a budget mixing glass

This glass will tip more easily when mixing, and doesn’t look nearly as elegant as our top pick. But at less than a sixth of the price, it does the trick (and can also work as half of a Boston shaker setup).

A tempered pint glass such as the Anchor Hocking Pint Mixing Glass does not meet the recommendations for a wide base and straight sides. However, it is inexpensive, thick, heavy, durable, fits a Hawthorne strainer snugly, and is multipurpose if you also use it as a shaker and/or drinking glass.

The angle of the glass makes it more difficult to get a smooth and fast stir, and pouring can be less precise than a true mixing glass with a good spout. But the glass does the job and it even makes a good vessel for muddling herbs or citrus.

Mixing glass competition

The mixing glasses we tested, including two French press beakers. Photo: Emily Han

Cocktail Kingdom’s Seamless Yarai Mixing Glass is slightly bigger than the aforementioned mixing glass (550 mL versus 500 mL). It, too, has a wide base, but here the glass is lighter and it does not sit completely flat, making it wobble slightly while mixing. A Hawthorne strainer fits more snugly than the other glass, and the spout is smaller and more precise for pouring.

A couple of our experts recommended Williams-Sonoma’s version of the Yarai glass, but it is no longer available. Instead, we tested the W&P Mixing Glass now available at Williams-Sonoma (and elsewhere). Although it is sturdy, durable, and fits a Hawthorne strainer snugly, the taller height of the glass makes stirring and pouring feel a bit awkward. The glass also has a wide spout that makes pouring less precise than glasses with narrower spouts.

We considered French press carafes, such as the BonJour French Press Replacement Glass Carafe and the Bodum Spare Glass Carafe, but realized these would not work as they typically come in sizes that are too small (1ounces) or too large (3ounces) for a Hawthorne strainer. Furthermore, these inexpensive carafes are made of thin, light glass that moves and wobbles while stirring.

While functional and potentially attractive to some, we omitted scientific beakers from our review because we believe the prominent measurement marks on these glasses detract from the art of using a mixing glass to make cocktails.

Although your favorite bartender may free pour liquor right from the bottle into the shaker tin or mixing glass, measuring into a jigger offers much more accuracy (especially if you’re new to making cocktails). After retesting our original pick along with seven additional models in 201year, we continue to stand by our original recommendation of the OXO Good Grips ¼-cup Mini Angled Measuring Cup.

The OXO also helps prevent spilling and messes—a common problem with traditional two-sided jiggers—because it features a useful pour spout and has extra space in the cup above the highest measurement.

The OXO mini measuring cup’s top-down visibility, pour spout, and space above the top fill line separates it from traditional jiggers. Photo: Emily Han

Brian Van Flandern says, “while I am not normally a fan of plastic, this one is dishwasher safe and allows the user to accurately measure in both ounces, tablespoons, milliliters, and even cups. It is easy to see the measurements even in low light as the inside is marked with clear red lines…the high quality of the plastic does not emit any odors that can alter the flavor of your drink.”

Phone Cameras

Samsung’s Galaxy SEdge has a resolution of 6MP (as opposed to 12MP on the Galaxy S6), but uses a larger sensor and larger pixels to absorb more light. best smartphone cameras also have more sophisticated software features, such capturing images using the front and back cameras simultaneously, or erasing stray subjects from the frame.

Apple iPhone has over other smartphones is that there are many iPhone lens kits that will help you get more out of that phone’s camera.

Pros: Easily share images and videos over cellular and Wi-Fi networks; no need to bring an extra camera; huge number of photo apps let you tweak you images and share them on social networks.

Cons: Image quality is at best on par with an entry-level point-and-shoot camera’s; tiny image sensors tend to produce digital grain — aka “noise” — in low-light images; small built-in lenses, for the most part, don’t offer any optical zoom.Key Features: Connectivity; convenience; sharing; burst (rapid) shot and panorama modes; image stabilization on some models.

Key Accessories: Phone cases; photo apps; add-on lenses, grips and tripods in some cases.

Mirrorless Cameras

With their small interchangeable lenses, mirrorless cameras (also known as compact system and micro four thirds) are designed to combine the portability of a point and shoot or bridge camera with the superior image quality of a larger DSLR. Unlike DSLRs, these models don’t use a mirror-based optical viewfinder system — allowing them to be smaller. Currently, our top pick is the Sony Alpha a6300, but we have other favorite mirrorless cameras for beginners and pros

Pros: Close to DSLR-level image quality in smaller camera bodies with smaller lenses; without the “mirror-slap” of a DSLR, mirrorless cameras are quieter and more inconspicuous; no mirror means fewer moving parts to break.

Cons: Limited lens options; slower performance — particularly autofocus — compared with DSLRs; expensive.

Key Features: Small interchangeable lenses; small camera bodies; larger sensor than point-and-shoot and bridge cameras.

Key Accessories: External flash; external electronic viewfinder; protective case.

Aperture

In basic terms, aperture is the size of the opening in a lens. In advanced cameras, such as digital SLRs, mirrorless compact system cameras and even many point-and-shoot models, the photographer can manually set the aperture to control the amount of light that reaches the imaging sensor. Look for lenses with a larger maximum aperture — which are inversely expressed with a lower number, such as f/2.or f/1.They let more light hit the sensor, so you can shoot brighter, sharper images in dark conditions. They also blur the background in portraits, bringing attention to the subject’s face. 

Focal Length

Focal length describes how close a lens can make a subject appear. Zoom lenses provide variable focal length, from wide-angle shots to close-ups. Focal length is specified in millimeters — such as with a 70mm-200mm telephoto zoom lens — or by a magnification factor, such as 5x, 10x or 20x. Some lenses, called “primes,” have a fixed focal length, such as 35mm or 50mm. While less flexible, prime lenses typically produce better image quality and are less expensive than zooms. A good prime lens is generally capable of a larger aperture.

ISO Rating

ISO speed, a standard used to denote film sensitivity, has carried over to digital cameras. The higher you set the ISO, the more effective the camera is at capturing images in low light without a flash. All things being equal, a larger sensor — with larger pixels — is capable of better image quality at a higher ISO. However, there is a trade-off: The higher you set the sensitivity, the greater the distortion, or “noise,” which shows up as graininess in a photo.

A maximum ISO capability of 6400 or greater will allow you to capture images in dim conditions inside and out, but the amount of noise will depend on the size and quality of the sensor and the ability of the camera’s image processor to clean up images.

Shutter Speed

The shutter speed is the amount of time the shutter is open in a camera. The faster the shutter speed, the more clearly a moving object can be captured. Shutter speed settings are typically measured in tenths or hundredths of a second. Cameras capable of faster shutter speeds are better for freezing action, so if you like sports photography, you want a camera that can shoot at 1/500 of second and faster. The best DSLRs are capable of shooting at 1/8,000, which is nice if you photograph car racing, but it’s faster than most photographers probably need.

HD Video

Once a luxury feature, the ability to record HD video at up to 1080p is now common in everything from smartphone cameras to DSLRs. In fact, Ultra HD (or 4K, which is 3840 x 2160 pixels) video is now starting to appear in smartphones, though it has yet to show up in many larger cameras.

Frame rates vary, including 60p (i.e. 60 frames per second) for smooth video of fast action, 24fps for a film-like look and even 240fps (in the iPhone 6s) for playing back footage in slow motion.

GPS Tagging

Some cameras offer built-in GPS to geotag your photos. After your shots are geotagged with latitude and longitude, you can import them into mapping software — such as in Apple’s iPhoto — and the images will pop up on a digital map over the location where they were shot.

Lens Mount

It goes without saying that you want to buy a lens that will attach on your camera, and this is known as the lens mount. Camera manufacturers generally make lenses with proprietry mounts which will only fit their devices, sometimes having multiple lens mounts for different camera lines. The major exception to this is Micro Four Thirds lenses which can be used on respective Olympus and Panasonic cameras. Third party manufacturers also make lenses with mounts to fit various brands.

It’s important to know which mount your camera uses before heading out to buy a lens. Example lens mounts for DSLRs include the Nikon F-mount, Canon’s EF or EF-S, the Pentax K and Sony’s Alpha (A) mount. For mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras, these are things like the Canon EF-M, Fujifilm XF, Nikon 1, Sony E, Samsung NX and Pentax Q. As mentioned earlier, Olympus and Panasonic Micro Four Thirds cameras take any Micro Four Thirds mount lenses.

In addition to being able to mount the lens on your camera, you need to be sure it will produce an image big enough to cover the image sensor. Because different cameras use different size sensors, manufacturers produce specific lenses to work with them.

For example, while Nikon DSLRs come with full frame or APS-C sensors – and both take F-mount lenses – its DX lenses only produce an image big enough to cover the smaller of the two sensors. Meanwhile, FX lenses cover the full frame and can also be used on DX and even Nikon cameras (with an adapter). This is done because lenses designed for smaller sensors can be physically smaller and lighter themselves.

Ultra Wide

What they are: Ultra Wide angle lenses have a focal length of around less than 2mm (in 3mm-format), this means they can take in a wider scene than is typical, though they’re not only about getting all of a subject into a shot. Rectilinear ultra wides help keep straight lines, just that, while fisheyes will reproduce buildings with curved walls.

Image characteristics: Because of the wide field of view, shots with ultra wide angle lenses typically feature a large depth of field. Images tend to pull in subjects that are close, and push away more distant ones making them appear further apart. Perspective distortion of ultra wides can give falling-building-syndrome (where vertical lines converge) but this can be corrected in post-processing, or minimized with good technique.

What they are used for: While often seen as a specialist lens, ultra wide angles can be used in a number of ways. Typical uses include landscape, architecture and interior photography. Even the distortion can be used creatively, especially when using fisheye lenses.

Wide Angle

What they are: Typically covering a focal length between 2mm and 3mm, Wide Angle lenses are available as primes or zooms and come with either variable or fixed maximum aperture. Offering a wide field of view, they often also boast close minimum focusing distances.

Image characteristics: Wide angle photographs can magnify the perceived distance between subjects in the foreground and background. Wide angles suffer less distortion than their ultra wide counterparts, but you still get an exaggeration of lines and curves which can be used artistically.

What they are used for: Many people only reach for a wide angle lens when trying to get the whole of a subject in frame, whether that’s a building, a large group of people or a landscape. However, while those are perfectly good uses of one, they can also be used for interesting portraits where you want to place a subject in a situation. Just be careful not to distort faces unflatteringly by shooting too close.

Telephoto

What they are: Telephoto lenses are those with a focal length in excess of 70 mm, though many people would argue that “true” telephoto lenses are ones which exceed 13mm. They focus on a much narrower field of view than other lenses, which means they are good for focusing in on specific details or distant subjects. They are generally larger and heavier than equally specified wider lenses.

Image characteristics: Because they have a narrower angle of view, telephoto lenses bring far away subjects closer. They can also have the effect of compressing the sense of distance in a scene and making objects appear closer together. A narrow depth of field means that a subject can be in focus with a blurred background and foreground.

What they are used for: In addition to being used to photograph subjects you can’t (or don’t want to) get close to – like sports or wildlife – telephoto lenses can be used for shooting portraits and even landscapes where their normalization of relative size can be used to give a sense of scale.

Superzoom

What they are: Superzooms are do-it-all lenses which cover focal lengths from wide to telephoto. They can be good for uses in situations where you can’t or don’t want to be changing lenses and they normally change in length as you zoom.

Image characteristics: Because compromises have had to be made producing a do-it-all lens, superzooms do not have the same image quality of more dedicated lenses and often have slower and variable maximum apertures.

What they are used for: Offering a one-lens package, superzooms come into their own if you can’t (or don’t want to) change lenses. This could be when in situations where it wouldn’t be safe to switch lenses, or when travelling – you don’t necessarily want to be weighed down by five lenses when on holiday with the family.

What they are: One of the more specialist lenses, marco lenses are technically those which are capable of reproduction ratios greater than 1:However, the term is frequently used to refer to any lens which can be used for extreme close-up photography. Macro lenses typically have focal lengths somewhere between 40-200 mm.

Image characteristics: Macro lenses normally have excellent image sharpness, though it’s worth noting that when working at close distances they also have a tiny depth of field. You can often end up with a shot of an insect where only a fraction of it is in focus.

What they are used for: Though normally used for close-up photography (at which they excel), macro lenses can also be great for portraits thanks to their typical sharpness and focal lengths.

I want to do street photography

Street photography can be done with almost any lens, though a 300 mm F2.might raise a few eyebrows from your subjects. However, a focal range of around 35-50 mm is often seen as the ideal for capturing the moment in urban areas.

Unless you want all of your subjects looking directly at the camera, you’d probably be best served by something discrete. It’s also important that street photography lenses feature a fast maximum aperture for lower-light situations. This means that something like the Fuji XF 2mm f1.R Lens would be a great selection. The Sigma 3mm F1.DG HSM has also been very well received by many DSLR street shooters.

I struggle to photograph my kids running around in the garden

Many people shell out for a DSLR or mirrorless interchangeable lens camera when they have a child, but by the time that child starts running around, the kit lens struggles to keep up, both in terms of aperture and focal range. This is especially true if you’re trying to photograph the kids running around in the garden or on the sports field.

This means you need something with a bit more reach, but probably without the bulk and weight that a professional lens would bring. A zoom lens will allow you to keep your shots framed as you want while your subject moves around in front of you. So, if you feel you just need some added reach, the EF-S 55-250 mm f/4-5.IS II could get you closer to the action. But if you want a bit more speed (and to be the best equipped parent at the game), there’s the Canon EF 70-200 mm f/4L USM.

I want to take landscape photographs

While the kit lenses which come with most cameras are surprisingly good at the wide angle end, you could find that they don’t quite go far enough for some of the landscape images you try to take. So, unless you’re able to keep moving backwards, you’re going to need a new lens.

Focal length is key here, and you’ll only get some landscapes if you’ve got an ultra wide angle lens. You could go for either a prime or a zoom, but most people in this situation are probably going to be best-served by a zoom. A lens like the AF-S DX NIKKOR 10-2mm f/3.5-4.5G ED could be good for APS-C Nikon shooters, while the Olympus 9-1mm f/4-5.ZUIKO would do the job on Micro Four Thirds cameras.

I want a lens which will make me improve as a photographer

After a while you might find that you’ve simply outgrown your kit lens. You suddenly find that it’s stifling your creative ambitions and preventing you from taking the photos that you want, even if they are within its focal length reach.

This is the ideal time to get yourself a fast prime lens, and the good news is that you don’t have to spend a fortune to do it. Getting something like a Nikon AF-S DX NIKKOR 3mm f/1.8G or the Sony E 50 mm f/1.OSS will mean you can play around with shallower depths of field, and shoot naturally in conditions that would have otherwise required a flash. Because they are primes, it also means you need to zoom with your feet, which will in turn probably mean you spend more time thinking about how you compose shots. Never a bad thing.

TWO Six Shooter Shot Glasses

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Alternatively, we can provide you an excellent personalization experience and show you exactly what your personalized product will look like, but you’ll need to use a modern browser for the best experience. Below are two very popular options to choose from:

Tea Strainers

Tea strainers resemble small sieves and are used for straining tea that has been made with loose tea leaves. Tea bag tongs are small flat tongs used for squeezing and removing teabags from your cup.

Coffee filters are used when brewing coffee. Fresh coffee grounds are placed in the filter and hot water is poured on top. The filter allows the brewed coffee to seep through whilst the grounds remain in the filter. Some filters are available for individual cups of coffee, sitting in or on top of a cup.

Stencils and Shakers

Stencils and shakers are used for creating delicate patterns on top of your coffee foam with cocoa powder. These patterns can be seasonal like snowflakes or general like leaf patterns. The shaker is a tin with a perforated lid that you put the cocoa powder in. A quick shake of the tin over the stencil will create the desired pattern.

Openers

Bottle openers come in variety of designs and methods and are used for removing corks from wine bottles and crown tops from beer bottles. Popular styles of corkscrew include the winged corkscrew and the waiter’s friend – these require some effort from the user to remove the cork. Lever openers, ‘just turn’ models and electric corkscrews require less effort but are generally more expensive to buy. Models like the waiter’s friend and winged corkscrew also incorporate a crown top opener into the design. A foil cutter is used for removing the foil that covers the tops of wine bottles. Again this is incorporated into some types of corkscrew.

Coolers

Bottle coolers are available in a variety of designs. The most commonly used coolers are double walled buckets that can be chilled before use, or buckets that can contain ice. Other coolers include neoprene sleeves that act like wet suits and maintain the temperature of the bottle for as long as possible. These sleeves are great for outdoor dining like picnics and barbecues as they are compact, light and small to store and pack.

French Press Cafetiere

This type of cafetiere is best described as being a jug with a filter and a plunger. Coffee grounds are placed in the bottom of the jug and hot water is poured on top. The plunger and circular filter is placed on top of the coffee and after a few minutes of brewing, the plunger is pressed down slowly until the filter reaches the bottom. This process traps the loose coffee under the filter leaving you free to enjoy the freshly pressed coffee.

Filters

Due to wear and tear over time, the mesh filter of the cafetiere will occasionally need to be replaced. Replacement filters are available, either on their own, or as part of a three piece set that includes the upper and lower discs that the mesh sit between. The upper disc incorporates a spring coil around the edge which creates resistance when you are plunging the filter.

Pour Over Coffee Maker

The pour over coffee maker is an alternative way of preparing fresh coffee, the filter cup sits on the top of the round jug with the ground beans inside, pour over hot water and allow the fresh coffee to drip down. The fresh coffee can now be poured straight from this.

Insulated Jug

These jugs are designed to hold a large amount of liquid like hot water, tea or coffee. The generous size is ideal for catering for several people at functions. The jugs will be double-walled with a vacuum in between to keep hot contents warm and cold contents cool.

Double Walled

These glasses, some with handles, are mostly used for espressos and coffees. The double walled space keeps the coffee hotter for longer whilst keeping the outside cool to the touch. Double walled glasses are very stylish too and look great as part of your daily coffee ritual.

Champagne

Champagne glasses range from saucers to flutes and are a top attraction at any celebration. Champagne saucers are wide, shallow and curved glasses sat on the top of long tall stems, they always look great for serving to guests. Champagne saucers can be stacked to create a fountain, from the top Champagne is poured until it flows all the way down to the bottom until all the glasses are filled. A star attraction. Other Champagne glasses include flutes which are long tall and thin.

Shot Glasses

Shot glasses are just as they sound, a small cylindrical glass just about big enough for one shot. These shots are mainly associated with tequila and vodka. Shot glasses can also be used for creating chilled recipes like alcoholic jello shots or an appetiser called amuse bouche and can be a great way of serving a chilled dessert as they can be styled and served in a culinary fashion.

Electric Grinder

An electric grinder is used for grinding fresh coffee beans into a fine powder for use in a coffee filter, cafetiere or a machine. An electric grinder will use a stainless steel blade that will spin at a precise RPM to finely grid the beans into aromatic freshly ground coffee. A viewing window will allow you to determine how course or fine you want your coffee.

Manual Grinder

A manual coffee grinder is similar and sometimes referred to as a mill. The manual turn handle to grind the coffee is normally on the top, the beans will be poured in and the grinding mechanism will be operated by the handle. This allows the grade and size of ground coffee to be more controlled. The manual grinder will have a drawer or collection tray at the base called a hopper.

Tea Infuser

An Infuser is a small perforated object used for loose tea, the infuser is filled with the tea and submerged into hot water to infuse the tea flavour into the water. The design of the infuser can be a round ball, egg shaped or a novelty design such as an animal or a fish.

A water infuser is used for flavouring water with fresh fruit. A removable chamber can be filled with fruit which will infuse the water giving you naturally flavoured fruit water.

Handheld Frother

A handheld frother is used for thickening and frothing milk, it can also be used for frothing hot chocolate and coffee. The handheld frother is motorised and spins the mini frother on the end very fast to whip up the milk for the top of hot drinks or for a smooth hot chocolate.

Frothing jug

A frothing jug is perfect for using to froth your milk in due to its wide pouring spout. This makes it easier to pour as the milk will be thick and you will have more control over this. Some frothing jugs come with their own frother as part of the lid. As the plunger is pushed manually, the attached whisk at the bottom will spin to create the froth.

Coffee Pot

The stove top kettle is used for boiling water on a hob. Traditionally this is how water was boiled for tea, coffee and even for washing before the days of the electric kettle. The kettle is filled with fresh water and placed on the stove. When the water is boiled the kettle will whistle through a steam vent or flap to indicate this. These kettles are suitable for all hobs but some may exclude induction due to the material it is made from, always check manufacturer’s recommendations.

Storage pots for tea, coffee and sugar come in a range of styles and material to fit in with the theme of your kitchen. The storage jars should have a secure and sealed lid to keep moisture out.

Tea Pot

A teapot is used for brewing tea, either using tea bags or loose tea (you’ll need a tea strainer to catch the loose leaves when pouring). Teapots are generally sized by the amount of cups it can make – ranging from one cup up to 1cups. Larger teapots used for catering and events will be sized in litres.

Tea Press

A tea press is similar to a coffee cafetiere in that the tea, either bags or leaves, are put inside a central filter and left to steep. The plunger is pressed to push the tea to the bottom of the filter, locking the tea away and allowing the tea to be poured. These tea presses are more commonly used for tea leaves or herbs but tea bags can also be used in the press.

Travel Mug

A travel mug is used for carrying coffee or tea to drink on the go. These mugs are generally tall and are insulated or double walled to keep your drinks warm. The travel mug will have some form of drinking spout and many have some form of stopper to prevent spillages. Care should be taken as although travel mugs might be spill-proof they may still leak hot liquids if not kept upright.

Travel Press

A travel press is a cafetiere that you can use on the go. The tall insulated mug in addition to the leak proof lid and drinking spout also contains a plunger for steeping a pressing of your fresh coffee and tea. The fresh pressed drink can then be consumed straight from the mug.

Mug Cafetiere

A mug cafetiere is a large insulated mug with a filter and a plunger. This allows the use of fresh coffee or tea to be added to the bottom of the mug. After the water has been added and allowed time to steep, the plunger with the filter on is then pressed down and the coffee grounds or tea leaves are pressed to the bottom of the mug. The plunger itself embeds into the handle so that it is no longer visible or in the way when drinking.

Storage

Some drinkware items are designed to be stacked together, but do so with care not to scratch off any patterned or coloured areas. Delicate items like china and glass should be handled carefully and not stored with other heavy or sharp items that could damage or break them. Bulkier items should be stored separately and not stacked where they could damage other smaller delicate items.

 

 

 

 

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Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your Shot Glasses wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of Shot Glasses

 

 

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