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Top Of The Best Mixed Drinkware Sets Reviewed In 2018

Last Updated April 1, 2018
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Adrian HoffmanHi! My name is Reginald Meyer. After putting in 50+ hours of research and testing, I made a list of the best Mixed Drinkware Sets of 2018 and explained their differences and advantages.

In this article, I will be categorizing the items according to their functions and most typical features. I hope that my Top 10 list will provide you great options in buying the right fit for you.

 

 

Feel free to explore the podium, click on the pictures to find out more.

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Mixed Drinkware Sets by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Cresimo Pro Stainless Steel Cocktail Bar Tool Set & Bonus Fold Out Cocktail Recipe Guide / Bartender Martini Shaker w/ Strainer Corkscrew, Bottle Opener, Jigger, Ice Tongs & Storage Rack

 
Cresimo Pro Stainless Steel Cocktail Bar Tool Set & Bonus Fold Out Cocktail Recipe Guide / Bartender Martini Shaker w/ Strainer Corkscrew, Bottle Opener, Jigger, Ice Tongs & Storage Rack
Pros
GREAT VALUE » Complete Cocktail Shaker Bar Set made of superior 18/8 grade stainless steel. Professional shaker with a 19 oz capacity / hawthorne strainer / a premium double size 1.0 / 0.5 oz measurement jigger tool / corkscrew / bottle opener / ice tongs / plus an Illustrated Guide to Cocktails recipe fold out guide.
 

 

№2 – Original Viking Drinking Horn Cup Tankard By Thor Horn| Complete W/ Authentic Medieval Burlap Gift Sack| Drink Beer Like A True Viking W/ Our Horn Mug

 
Original Viking Drinking Horn Cup Tankard By Thor Horn| Complete W/ Authentic Medieval Burlap Gift Sack| Drink Beer Like A True Viking W/ Our Horn Mug
Pros
100% AUTHENTIC VIKING FEEL: You can now enjoy the authentic design and feeling of drinking beer like a proper Viking! Made from a solid piece of horn, it will feel just right in your hands and we GUARANTEE you won’t go back to drinking beer any other way.
 

 

№3 – Galaxy Glassware 12-pc. Set

 
Galaxy Glassware 12-pc. Set
Pros
Number of Pieces: 12
Includes: 4 – 17oz Hiball Glasses
4 – 13oz DOF Glasses
4 – 7oz Juice Glasses
Material: Glass
 

 

The basic home bar

Our favorite essential home barware. Back row, from left to right: Umami Mart’s Seamless Plain Mixing Glass, OXO Steel Cocktail Strainer, Usagi Cobbler Shaker, Koriko Weighted Shaking Tins, Fletcher’s Mill’s 11-inch Muddler,  and Cocktail Kingdom’s Teardrop Barspoon. Front row, left to right, Chef’n’s FreshForce Citrus Juicer and OXO Good Grips ¼-cup Mini Angled Measuring Cup. Photo: Kate Milford

You don’t need a lot of equipment to make great drinks at home. If you’re just getting into cocktails, you might start with a shaker, a jigger, and a strainer. More advanced mixologists should consider investing in a good mixing glass, spoon, muddler, and citrus press. Here’s a rundown of what you’ll need, depending on the types of drinks you like.

Shaker: Perhaps the most basic bar tool, this is used to shake cocktails that include mixers (such as juice, dairy, or egg) to blend flavors from the various spirits and ingredients and to chill, aerate, and dilute the drink. Although shakers can be subdivided further, the Boston and cobbler styles are the two main setups you’ll see. Most professionals use Boston shakers, which are comprised of large and small cups that fit together. Both cups are usually metal, but sometimes bartenders use a pint glass for the smaller one. A Boston shaker requires a little more finesse to connect and shake, and needs a separate strainer. Cobbler-style shakers, on the other hand, are more popular with home bartenders. Generally, they separate into three pieces: a canister, a lid with a strainer, and a cap to cover up the holes. These have a tendency to leak, but they don’t require a separate strainer.

Mixing glass: Cocktails made entirely of alcohol (or perhaps very light mixers), such as a martini or Manhattan, should be stirred. Although you can stir in something like a pint glass, a mixing glass with straight sides, a heavy base, and a pour spout works far better (and looks nicer). Mixing glasses are traditionally made of glass rather than metal; glass is a better insulator and allows the guest to watch the cocktail being made.

Bar spoon: Used for preparing stirred cocktails, a bar spoon has a long handle for reaching the bottom of a mixing glass. A good spoon can also scoop up garnishes.

Muddler: This tool smashes herbs, fruit, or sugar cubes for making cocktails like a mojito. All manner of muddlers exist, from heavy plastic cylinders to artisan-made wooden objets d’art to the disk-shaped end of a bar spoon.

Citrus press: Most of the bartenders we spoke with recommended a hand press for citrus-based cocktails. Hand-held citrus reamers tend to be difficult to use; electric and manual presses produce more juice than the average home bartender needs. A hand press, which has a cup for the cut half of citrus and levered handles, will more easily produce the right amount of juice for a couple of drinks.

Our favorite Boston shaker, the Koriko Weighted Shaking Tins, has better balance and a more easily breakable seal than other shakers we tried. Photo: Kate Milford

If you want a cobbler shaker

This all-in-one shaker and strainer will be easier to use for novice mixologists. It has less of a tendency to leak than other cobbler-style shakers, and it feels more solidly built.

Although pro bartenders generally prefer and recommend two-piece Boston shakers, the style does take a separate strainer (and a little more finesse) to work with. If you want an all-in-one solution, we like the Usagi Cobbler Shaker. Chris Tunstall recommends a cobbler shaker for beginners because you don’t need a separate strainer, but these shakers also have a terrible reputation for leaking. Several of our experts criticized them for lids that get stuck and poor built-in strainers with holes that are inefficient, too big, or that drip. The Usagi is the only cobbler shaker we’ve found that doesn’t leak while shaking and that came apart easily.

We tested the quality of the built-in strainer of the cobbler shakers by checking how easy it was to remove the cap and by filling the shaker with small shards of ice and pieces of herbs. Photo: Emily Han

Pull Quote

Our experts cautioned against buying expensive shakers at fancy kitchen stores (they are designed more for looks than functionality), as well as cheaply-made shakers often sold at liquor stores.

The Usagi feels heavier and more solid than Oggi’s Marilyn Tall and Slim Cocktail Shaker, our top cobbler pick from 201(which, according to some of our readers, also has some leaking problems). All three parts of the Usagi shaker remained snug while shaking, yet the parts weren’t so tight that it was tough to break the seal. We also appreciated that the Usagi shaker has a little ergonomic indentation in the cap where you can put your index finger while shaking. For those who care, this shaker also looks nice and classic.

Our experts cautioned against buying expensive shakers at fancy kitchen stores (they are designed more for looks than functionality), as well as cheaply-made shakers often sold at liquor stores.

Jeffrey Morgenthaler praises the Koriko Weighted Shaking Tins, while Robert Hess recommends both the Koriko tins and Usagi Cobbler Shaker models (with preference given to the Boston style).

Our mixing glass pick

This glass has a more stable base and better pour spout than others we looked at. Its understated lines will also complement a variety of styles better than etched versions.

All of the glasses we tried were comparable in size and durability, but the Umami Mart’s wide, heavy base gives it more stability; it does not tip or move around, making it one of the easiest glasses we tried for stirring liquid and ice with a bar spoon. Cocktail Kingdom’s Seamless Yarai Mixing Glass, by comparison, didn’t sit flat on the counter and wobbled with stirring, as did the lightweight French press carafes we tried.

An OXO Hawthorne strainer snugly fit the mouths of most of the mixing glasses we tested. But the spout on the Umami Mart glass is smaller and more precise than those on Cocktail Kingdom’s Yarai Mixing Glass and the W&P Mixing Glass, making straining the drink into a cocktail glass a more foolproof affair. Cocktail Kingdom’s Seamless Yarai Mixing Glass has a similar pour spout and is few dollars cheaper, but its tendency to wobble knocked it out of the running.

Spout size and shape can affect how easy it is to strain and pour from a mixing glass. We preferred the more narrow spout of the Umami Mart glass, far right. Photo: Emily Han

Though it looks delicate, the Umami Mart is made of weighty glass that’s less likely to break than something like a French press beaker. Durability is important “because you’re definitely going to break your mixing glass at some point,” says Jeffrey Morgenthaler. “It’s just a matter of when, and a heavier glass is going to live longer than a lighter one.”

At 550 mL (or 18.5ounces), enough for two drinks, we think the Umami Mart is just right for most home cocktail making. Mixing glasses generally range from 1ounces (480 mL) to 3ounces (one L), but we only tested those of comparable size to the Umami Mart glass. Morgenthaler notes that “a good mixing glass has to be large enough to hold the drink, and a good amount of ice. Smaller is definitely not better here.”

Also great for a budget mixing glass

This glass will tip more easily when mixing, and doesn’t look nearly as elegant as our top pick. But at less than a sixth of the price, it does the trick (and can also work as half of a Boston shaker setup).

A tempered pint glass such as the Anchor Hocking Pint Mixing Glass does not meet the recommendations for a wide base and straight sides. However, it is inexpensive, thick, heavy, durable, fits a Hawthorne strainer snugly, and is multipurpose if you also use it as a shaker and/or drinking glass.

The angle of the glass makes it more difficult to get a smooth and fast stir, and pouring can be less precise than a true mixing glass with a good spout. But the glass does the job and it even makes a good vessel for muddling herbs or citrus.

Mixing glass competition

The mixing glasses we tested, including two French press beakers. Photo: Emily Han

Cocktail Kingdom’s Seamless Yarai Mixing Glass is slightly bigger than the aforementioned mixing glass (550 mL versus 500 mL). It, too, has a wide base, but here the glass is lighter and it does not sit completely flat, making it wobble slightly while mixing. A Hawthorne strainer fits more snugly than the other glass, and the spout is smaller and more precise for pouring.

A couple of our experts recommended Williams-Sonoma’s version of the Yarai glass, but it is no longer available. Instead, we tested the W&P Mixing Glass now available at Williams-Sonoma (and elsewhere). Although it is sturdy, durable, and fits a Hawthorne strainer snugly, the taller height of the glass makes stirring and pouring feel a bit awkward. The glass also has a wide spout that makes pouring less precise than glasses with narrower spouts.

We considered French press carafes, such as the BonJour French Press Replacement Glass Carafe and the Bodum Spare Glass Carafe, but realized these would not work as they typically come in sizes that are too small (1ounces) or too large (3ounces) for a Hawthorne strainer. Furthermore, these inexpensive carafes are made of thin, light glass that moves and wobbles while stirring.

While functional and potentially attractive to some, we omitted scientific beakers from our review because we believe the prominent measurement marks on these glasses detract from the art of using a mixing glass to make cocktails.

Although your favorite bartender may free pour liquor right from the bottle into the shaker tin or mixing glass, measuring into a jigger offers much more accuracy (especially if you’re new to making cocktails). After retesting our original pick along with seven additional models in 201year, we continue to stand by our original recommendation of the OXO Good Grips ¼-cup Mini Angled Measuring Cup.

The OXO also helps prevent spilling and messes—a common problem with traditional two-sided jiggers—because it features a useful pour spout and has extra space in the cup above the highest measurement.

The OXO mini measuring cup’s top-down visibility, pour spout, and space above the top fill line separates it from traditional jiggers. Photo: Emily Han

Brian Van Flandern says, “while I am not normally a fan of plastic, this one is dishwasher safe and allows the user to accurately measure in both ounces, tablespoons, milliliters, and even cups. It is easy to see the measurements even in low light as the inside is marked with clear red lines…the high quality of the plastic does not emit any odors that can alter the flavor of your drink.”

Zalto Denk’Art Universal Glass

Since their arrival on the market several years back, stemless wine glasses have created quite a buzz. People either love them or can’t understand them, and there are some compelling reasons for both. The stemless supporters find these glasses easier to handle and much nickname “tumblers”). They are also quite versatile as not only can they be used for wine, but for cocktails and even juice or soda.

However the naysayers have something different to say. By holding a wine glass by the bowl not only are you marking up the glass with fingerprints, but warming up the glass with your body heat. While this may not be so bad for red wine (as sometimes it needs to be a little warmed up if coming right from the cellar), it is probably not the best idea for a chilled white wine especially on a hot summer day. These traditionalists typically prefer a stemmed glass as the temperature of the wine is unaffected, the bowl stays clean and they are arguably easier to swirl.

Like most things it comes down to a matter of preference. The stemless glasses are perfect if you are using it for more than just wine and can be doubled as an indoor/outdoor glass as well. But if you are looking to keep those bowls clean and that white wine cold, then you may want to stick with the stems.

Riedel Vinum Single Malt Glasses

I was given a set of Riedel Vinum Single Malt Whisky Glasses by my wife for a previous Christmas and I’m a big fan of the glasses. Riedel makes a whole line of glassware and their hallmark, at least in my mind, is that the glass is often high quality and remarkably thin.

From a design perspective, it opens up at the lip rather than closes in. Whereas the Glencairn almost focuses the aroma on your nose, this one doesn’t. The idea behind opening it up like this is so that the spirit “opens up” as it hits your tongue and lips. As a frequent user of the glass, I don’t know that much happens different if it “opens up” for the few millimeters before it gets to me!

What I do like about the glass is that it’s thin, so I don’t feel like I’m carry a bulky glass, and the opening is better suited for my nose. I don’t feel like I’m inhaling everything and so I don’t get an overwhelming nose, which I would get if I was too enthusiastic in sniffing a scotch in a Glencairn.

As was the case with the Glencairn, it’s best to avoid putting ice in this as it’s a more delicate glass and there isn’t really much room. On the downside, it’s more expensive than any other option here.

The NEAT Whiskey Glass

This is a relatively new entrant into the world of whiskey glasses. NEAT stands for Naturally Engineered Aroma Technology, which is hokey and terrible sounding, but by the shape of the glass you can already see that it looks the part.

Old Fashioned Tumblers

An Old Fashioned Tumbler is what most people think of when you talk about a tumbler (or lowball tumbler, as opposed to highball glass). It’s designed for mixed drinks, like the Old Fashioned after which it was named, and for enjoying whisky on the rocks. (Incidentally, an Old Fashioned is a lump of sugar, two dashes of bitters, ice, a lemon-peel, and a jigger of whiskey)

I don’t often enjoy my scotch on the rocks but if I did, I’d go with a tumbler. It’s the only glass where ice “feels” right and there isn’t much of a design here to accentuate any particular aspect of the scotch. I don’t think you lose anything from drinking scotch neat from a tumbler, the other designs just accentuate something that’s already there that you are getting anyway.

Buy Ravenscroft Crystal 10-1/2-Ounce Classic Double Old-Fashioned Glass, Set of (pictured)

The Rest

The Glencairn, the Riedel, the Copita and the Tumbler are the classics when you think about whisky glassware. There are, however, a million other types of glassware and any one that holds a spirit you could sip near (brandy, bourbon, tequila, etc.) will have properties that make it suitable for drinking scotch.

There are also fun rocking glasses, like these Normann Copenhagen Liqueur Glasses. Rocking (or swirling) glasses can be fun but they always make me nervous, so my case just has the classics.

Susquehanna Glass Brandy Snifter Glasses, 12-Ounce, Set of (pictured)

Directions

Preheat oven to 350°, grease one mixing bowl with butter and flour to prevent the cake from sticking and put to the side. Combine cake mix, water, oil and egg whites in the other mixing bowl, following the cake box directions.

Pour cake mix into the greased and floured bowl and bake for 40-50 minutes. Insert toothpick to see if cake is done: if toothpick comes out clean, the cake is ready.

Canteen Set

A canteen set of cutlery can range from a 4piece set to a 12piece set and will come beautifully displayed in a wooden canteen with softly lined cut-outs for each piece to sit securely in. Canteen sets like these are perfect for dinner parties and special occasions as the cutlery in this type of set will be high quality 18/stainless steel. Canteen sets when not in use also look stunning on display on a dresser or sideboard.

Accessory Set

Other items that complete your table include, cheese and butter knives, cake slices and dessert knives and forks. All of these can be bought separately to match your existing cutlery. These will also come in small sets or can be purchased individually. Steak knives and forks and fish knives can extend your cutlery set for those special meals. Although these come in smaller sets, some items are presented in pretty boxes which make great gifts for those trying to extend their collections.

Children’s Set

Giving a gift of cutlery to a child is a tradition passed down through the generations. A child’s cutlery set can start as a simple knife, fork and spoon with chunky melamine handles for their unsteady grips, and especially as they can feature a well-loved character on the handle like the Gruffalo or Belle & Boo. Cutlery for an older child is a higher quality stainless steel and will match the set used by the rest of the family but this will be a smaller design. Available in presentation boxes to give as gifts.

Individual pieces of cutlery can be purchased separately and are used and designed for a wide variety of tasks including your everyday meals.

Table Fork – Used for your main meal, this fork will be used alongside your main meal table knife and will be the largest fork in your set.

Pastry Fork – Mainly used for desserts like cheesecake and flans which contain pastry.

Fish Fork – A fork used together with the fish knife as a pair, used for eating fish.

Dessert Fork – Used for desserts without pastry, like soft gateaux and sponge desserts.

Steak Knife – A long serrated knife for cutting steak, this knife will generally have a good grip handle.

Table Knife – Your main knife for the main meal course and will generally be the largest in the set.

Fish Knife – Use alongside your fish fork for delicately cutting fish and seafood courses.

Cheese Knife – Designed for cutting all types of cheese and will feature a prong on the end for picking up your cut cheese.

Dessert Knife – A smaller knife with a smaller blade and a longer handle, use with your dessert fork.

Teaspoon – A small spoon used for tea and coffee and measure small amounts of ingredients.

Coffee Spoon – Slightly smaller than a teaspoon, this spoon will be used alongside serving coffee.

Latte / Sundae – A long handled teaspoon, designed for stirring long tall drinks and enjoying a tall dessert like a sundae.

Dessert Spoon – A dessert spoon is a little bit smaller than tablespoon and used for eating desserts and puddings.

Soup Spoon – A rounded spoon designed for scooping and eating soup.

Tablespoon – A deep large spoon used for serving and measuring ingredients.

Grapefruit Spoon – Similar in size to a teaspoon but the bowl of the spoon is more pointed and has serrated edges for cutting the fruit.

Serving

Mustard Spoon – A tiny spoon smaller than a teaspoon, perfect for serving a small amount of mustard. These spoons can be decorative or have a hook end to prevent them slipping into the mustard.

Straining Spoon – A straining spoon is slotted for draining vegetables from the cooking water or food from a sauce, once drained the vegetables or food can then be served.

Jam Spoon – A jam spoon is designed to serve jam, the spoon can have a kink in the handle that acts as a hook, preventing the full handle falling into the sticky jam.

Mint Sauce Spoon – A small teaspoon with a pouring lip on the side of the spoon head, this is used for pouring onto your lamb.

Cake Server – A cake server has a flat head, ideal for sliding under a slice of cake and lifting easily away for serving.

Sugar Tongs – Sugar tongs are small tongs for picking up sugar cubes when serving tea or coffee, they are small enough to put with a sugar bowl and not be too intrusive.

Salad Servers – A pair of spoons, sometimes with prongs, designed for delicately picking up salad. Sometimes these can be joined together at the handle for easy handling.

Storage

Cutlery Tray – Designed to fit into a kitchen drawer or a dresser, a cutlery tray is a shallow tray with sections for all of your cutlery, these come in a variety of materials and sizes suitable for different types of cutlery. Adding a cutlery tray to your drawer will keep the cutlery from being mixed up and makes it easy when selecting the right cutlery for your table layout.

Cutlery Cabinet – A cutlery cabinet, also known as a canteen, is a wooden presentation and storage box. Inside the hinged lid and box will be a soft velvet lining to protect the cutlery from scratches and damage. The boxes vary in wood types and styles and are great to display.

Materials

Silver Plated – Silver plating provides a high quality and high class finish to your cutlery. Different thicknesses of silver plating are available depending on the level of finish you require. Silver plated cutlery is ideal for entertaining and fine dining, though often reserved for special occasions.

Eco Fire Glass

Eco Fire Glass is a great option for consumers living the green lifestyle. It has been made from recycled postindustrial glass that has been melted down, then fused together. With its familiar “jelly bean” shape, eco fire glass is a great option to save some money and the environment.

Recycled Fire Glass

Recycled Fire Glass has been refired using the same process as all other types of fire glass in order to create the same high quality product with an eco friendly result. Recycled Fire Glass come in two different size ranges, 1/2″ or 3/4″ and comes in a variety of vibrant colors.

Sizing of Fire Glass

Not only are there multitudes of colors and styles, but the sizes of fire glass differ between the styles. While size ultimately doesn’t make a difference in the performance of your fire feature, you may decide you like larger or smaller fire glass. Use the image below as a guide to how large the fire glass styles are in reference to each other. If you have a hard time deciding what you like best, order one of our sample packs of fire glass and choose a small handful of styles to get an idea of what it looks like in person – only for the price of postage!

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Mixed Drinkware Sets by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your Mixed Drinkware Sets wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of Mixed Drinkware Sets

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about Mixed Drinkware Sets is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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