Welcome to Reviews & Buyer’s Guide!

Home tools Buyer's Guides from tech enthusiast who loves technology and clever solutions for better living.

Check Today Price

Top Of The Best Highball Glasses Reviewed In 2018

Last Updated July 1, 2018
Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0Share on StumbleUpon0Tweet about this on Twitter
Adrian HoffmanHi! My name is Reginald Meyer. After putting in 50+ hours of research and testing, I made a list of the best Highball Glasses of 2018 and explained their differences and advantages.

In this article, I will be categorizing the items according to their functions and most typical features. I hope that my Top 10 list will provide you great options in buying the right fit for you.

 

 

Feel free to explore the podium, click on the pictures to find out more.

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Highball Glasses by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Paksh Novelty Italian Highball Glasses [Set of 6] Clear Heavy Base Tall Bar Glass – Drinking Glasses for Water, Juice, Beer, Wine, Whiskey, and Cocktails | 13 Ounces

 
Paksh Novelty Italian Highball Glasses [Set of 6] Clear Heavy Base Tall Bar Glass - Drinking Glasses for Water, Juice, Beer, Wine, Whiskey, and Cocktails | 13 Ounces
Pros
This exquisite 6 piece 13 ounce glassware set features luxurious and luminous Italian crafted glass that’s sure to turn heads. These fine European glass tumblers preserve beverage’s crisp, rich texture for a fresh taste every time.
Modern yet timeless, these highball glasses dawn a contemporary look that is perfect for entertaining and everyday use. With its sleek silhouette and clean design, this tumbler glass set is versatile enough for casual and formal use.
 

 

№2 – Luminarc Barcraft Straight Sided On The Rocks (Set of 4), 10.5 oz, Clear

 
Luminarc Barcraft Straight Sided On The Rocks (Set of 4), 10.5 oz, Clear
Pros
Includes 6 straight sided on the rocks glasses
Capacity 10.5 ounces
Made in the USA
 

 

№3 – Lead-Free Crystal Double Old-Fashioned Highball Water Glasses, SET OF 6, Heavy Base Barware Glasses Set, 8oz Drinking Glasses. Free Set of 2 Bar Drink Coasters Included

 
Lead-Free Crystal Double Old-Fashioned Highball Water Glasses, SET OF 6, Heavy Base Barware Glasses Set, 8oz Drinking Glasses. Free Set of 2 Bar Drink Coasters Included
Pros
Looking for a perfect way to celebrate your victory or your promotion? Well then, add a touch of elegance to your celebration by serving the drinks in this attractive whiskey set. The set comprises of 6 double old-fashioned glasses
Designed to perfection, this set is lightweight, durable and stylish to look at. The perfect smooth and lusterous finish of this 6-piece set, all the more heightens its look.
 

 

On The Rock Glass With Ice Ball Maker

For those who like their whiskey on the chilled side, this rocks glass is the perfect option. Each set comes with a silicone mold that, when filled and frozen, forms a single solid ice ball that outlasts regular ice cubes. The glass itself also features a shape conducive for the ice ball, allowing the sipper to swirl with ease minus the worry of spillover.

Corkcicle Whiskey Wedge

The warm whiskey burn can end up deterring many from enjoying one of the world’s finest spirits. Here’s a fantastic solution to that obstacle. The Whiskey Wedge is an artful way to chill but not water down the dram, as the wedge is designed to melt at a much lower pace than floating ice cubes.

Orrefors ‘Intermezzo’ Old-Fashioned Glass

Truly one-of-a-kind, each Intermezzo glass features a drop of color in the stem that distinguishes the glass from anything else you’re ever encountered. It’s made from crystal, is dishwasher safe, and designed by Erika Lagerbielke; add a touch of modern to the bar.

Riedel VINUM Whiskey Glasses

World-famous glassmakers produce this fine whiskey vessel that’s made of 2percent lead crystal for enhanced clarity, a capacity of seven ounces, and features a short stem and elongated thistle-shaped body in order to enhance the characteristics of the whiskey for every drinker’s enjoyment.

Matterhorn Glass

If you’re more of a dreamer than a doer check out these Matterhorn glasses inspired by the famous mountain in the Alps. Each glass is crafted out of crystal and looks quite impressive when filled with a dram of your favorite whiskey. And while you may never actually hike the famed mountain, at least now you can admire it from afar.

Norlan Glass

Get your hands on this glass that was just given the green light for production after a successful Kickstarter campaign. It’s a transparent, double-walled sipping vessel formed from a specific glass-blowing technique. The Norlan weighs in at 12grams and features a faceted base to eliminate fingerprints on the bowl.

Dorset Double Old Fashioned Glasses

Getting its name from the photogenic county on England’ southern coastline, each Dorset Double is composed of lead-crystal and reflects light in all directions thanks to the hand-cut fluting on the side of the glass. Pick up a set of these and any cocktail or dram will be presented in a fantastic manner. iittala Ultima Thule

Classy. That’s the one adjective that comes to mind at first glance. Its design produces a more translucent appearance for the glass and even though they may look too delicate to wash after consumption, you’ll be please to know each piece is dishwasher safe. iittala Aarne Double Old Fashioned Glass

Looking a bit like a shot glass rather and your typical Old Fashioned, the wide mouth facilitates a fuller sip capacity without any drip and the whole piece is made from mouth-blown glass, designed by Goran Hongell. Its mid-century design is one of elegance and simplicity, marrying it well with any number of fine whiskeys.

Library Hand-Cut Double Old Fashioned Glass

Suited for a cool winter’s night next to a warm fireplace, the rough-hewn glass makes this vessel a fantastic addition to your wet bar. It’s crafted from molded blown soda glass, boasts a hand-cut design, and comes in a set of six that also includes a shot glass, highball, wine glass, flute, and martini glass as well.

Ox Horn Double Old Fashioned Whiskey Tumbler

If you’re not satisfied with drinking an after-hours pour out of glass then look to this Ox Horn built tumbler. Built from ethically-sourced horns, it hosts ounces of capacity, is polished to a bright finish, and handmade in England. Easily a more macho option for those whiskey drinkers out there.

Blade Runner Whiskey Glasses

If Harrison Ford drank whiskey, which we’re sure he does, he would certainly own a pair of these Blade Runner glasses. They feature a square design with diagonal cuts at the angles and were modeled after the exact same tumblers used by Deckard himself in the movie.

The Lowball Machined Whiskey Tumbler

As a hard working individual you appreciate the time and effort it takes to get something done correctly. The Lowball was conceived with this notion in mind and is crafted for that special moment when the day is done. The interior features CNC Lathe contours to create a perfect hourglass snifter profile and the tumbler boasts optimized geometry so it fits perfectly in your hand.

Forward

Shop Oregon Double Old-Fashioned Glass. A great addition to our popular Oregon stemware, the double old-fashined and highball glasses are machine-made using the latest technology to resemble the quality of handblown glassware at an everyday price.

Riedel Vinum Single Malt Glasses

I was given a set of Riedel Vinum Single Malt Whisky Glasses by my wife for a previous Christmas and I’m a big fan of the glasses. Riedel makes a whole line of glassware and their hallmark, at least in my mind, is that the glass is often high quality and remarkably thin.

From a design perspective, it opens up at the lip rather than closes in. Whereas the Glencairn almost focuses the aroma on your nose, this one doesn’t. The idea behind opening it up like this is so that the spirit “opens up” as it hits your tongue and lips. As a frequent user of the glass, I don’t know that much happens different if it “opens up” for the few millimeters before it gets to me!

What I do like about the glass is that it’s thin, so I don’t feel like I’m carry a bulky glass, and the opening is better suited for my nose. I don’t feel like I’m inhaling everything and so I don’t get an overwhelming nose, which I would get if I was too enthusiastic in sniffing a scotch in a Glencairn.

As was the case with the Glencairn, it’s best to avoid putting ice in this as it’s a more delicate glass and there isn’t really much room. On the downside, it’s more expensive than any other option here.

The NEAT Whiskey Glass

This is a relatively new entrant into the world of whiskey glasses. NEAT stands for Naturally Engineered Aroma Technology, which is hokey and terrible sounding, but by the shape of the glass you can already see that it looks the part.

Old Fashioned Tumblers

An Old Fashioned Tumbler is what most people think of when you talk about a tumbler (or lowball tumbler, as opposed to highball glass). It’s designed for mixed drinks, like the Old Fashioned after which it was named, and for enjoying whisky on the rocks. (Incidentally, an Old Fashioned is a lump of sugar, two dashes of bitters, ice, a lemon-peel, and a jigger of whiskey)

I don’t often enjoy my scotch on the rocks but if I did, I’d go with a tumbler. It’s the only glass where ice “feels” right and there isn’t much of a design here to accentuate any particular aspect of the scotch. I don’t think you lose anything from drinking scotch neat from a tumbler, the other designs just accentuate something that’s already there that you are getting anyway.

Buy Ravenscroft Crystal 10-1/2-Ounce Classic Double Old-Fashioned Glass, Set of (pictured)

The Rest

The Glencairn, the Riedel, the Copita and the Tumbler are the classics when you think about whisky glassware. There are, however, a million other types of glassware and any one that holds a spirit you could sip near (brandy, bourbon, tequila, etc.) will have properties that make it suitable for drinking scotch.

There are also fun rocking glasses, like these Normann Copenhagen Liqueur Glasses. Rocking (or swirling) glasses can be fun but they always make me nervous, so my case just has the classics.

Susquehanna Glass Brandy Snifter Glasses, 12-Ounce, Set of (pictured)

The basic home bar

Our favorite essential home barware. Back row, from left to right: Umami Mart’s Seamless Plain Mixing Glass, OXO Steel Cocktail Strainer, Usagi Cobbler Shaker, Koriko Weighted Shaking Tins, Fletcher’s Mill’s 11-inch Muddler,  and Cocktail Kingdom’s Teardrop Barspoon. Front row, left to right, Chef’n’s FreshForce Citrus Juicer and OXO Good Grips ¼-cup Mini Angled Measuring Cup. Photo: Kate Milford

You don’t need a lot of equipment to make great drinks at home. If you’re just getting into cocktails, you might start with a shaker, a jigger, and a strainer. More advanced mixologists should consider investing in a good mixing glass, spoon, muddler, and citrus press. Here’s a rundown of what you’ll need, depending on the types of drinks you like.

Shaker: Perhaps the most basic bar tool, this is used to shake cocktails that include mixers (such as juice, dairy, or egg) to blend flavors from the various spirits and ingredients and to chill, aerate, and dilute the drink. Although shakers can be subdivided further, the Boston and cobbler styles are the two main setups you’ll see. Most professionals use Boston shakers, which are comprised of large and small cups that fit together. Both cups are usually metal, but sometimes bartenders use a pint glass for the smaller one. A Boston shaker requires a little more finesse to connect and shake, and needs a separate strainer. Cobbler-style shakers, on the other hand, are more popular with home bartenders. Generally, they separate into three pieces: a canister, a lid with a strainer, and a cap to cover up the holes. These have a tendency to leak, but they don’t require a separate strainer.

Mixing glass: Cocktails made entirely of alcohol (or perhaps very light mixers), such as a martini or Manhattan, should be stirred. Although you can stir in something like a pint glass, a mixing glass with straight sides, a heavy base, and a pour spout works far better (and looks nicer). Mixing glasses are traditionally made of glass rather than metal; glass is a better insulator and allows the guest to watch the cocktail being made.

Bar spoon: Used for preparing stirred cocktails, a bar spoon has a long handle for reaching the bottom of a mixing glass. A good spoon can also scoop up garnishes.

Muddler: This tool smashes herbs, fruit, or sugar cubes for making cocktails like a mojito. All manner of muddlers exist, from heavy plastic cylinders to artisan-made wooden objets d’art to the disk-shaped end of a bar spoon.

Citrus press: Most of the bartenders we spoke with recommended a hand press for citrus-based cocktails. Hand-held citrus reamers tend to be difficult to use; electric and manual presses produce more juice than the average home bartender needs. A hand press, which has a cup for the cut half of citrus and levered handles, will more easily produce the right amount of juice for a couple of drinks.

Our favorite Boston shaker, the Koriko Weighted Shaking Tins, has better balance and a more easily breakable seal than other shakers we tried. Photo: Kate Milford

If you want a cobbler shaker

This all-in-one shaker and strainer will be easier to use for novice mixologists. It has less of a tendency to leak than other cobbler-style shakers, and it feels more solidly built.

Although pro bartenders generally prefer and recommend two-piece Boston shakers, the style does take a separate strainer (and a little more finesse) to work with. If you want an all-in-one solution, we like the Usagi Cobbler Shaker. Chris Tunstall recommends a cobbler shaker for beginners because you don’t need a separate strainer, but these shakers also have a terrible reputation for leaking. Several of our experts criticized them for lids that get stuck and poor built-in strainers with holes that are inefficient, too big, or that drip. The Usagi is the only cobbler shaker we’ve found that doesn’t leak while shaking and that came apart easily.

We tested the quality of the built-in strainer of the cobbler shakers by checking how easy it was to remove the cap and by filling the shaker with small shards of ice and pieces of herbs. Photo: Emily Han

Pull Quote

Our experts cautioned against buying expensive shakers at fancy kitchen stores (they are designed more for looks than functionality), as well as cheaply-made shakers often sold at liquor stores.

The Usagi feels heavier and more solid than Oggi’s Marilyn Tall and Slim Cocktail Shaker, our top cobbler pick from 201(which, according to some of our readers, also has some leaking problems). All three parts of the Usagi shaker remained snug while shaking, yet the parts weren’t so tight that it was tough to break the seal. We also appreciated that the Usagi shaker has a little ergonomic indentation in the cap where you can put your index finger while shaking. For those who care, this shaker also looks nice and classic.

Our experts cautioned against buying expensive shakers at fancy kitchen stores (they are designed more for looks than functionality), as well as cheaply-made shakers often sold at liquor stores.

Jeffrey Morgenthaler praises the Koriko Weighted Shaking Tins, while Robert Hess recommends both the Koriko tins and Usagi Cobbler Shaker models (with preference given to the Boston style).

Our mixing glass pick

This glass has a more stable base and better pour spout than others we looked at. Its understated lines will also complement a variety of styles better than etched versions.

All of the glasses we tried were comparable in size and durability, but the Umami Mart’s wide, heavy base gives it more stability; it does not tip or move around, making it one of the easiest glasses we tried for stirring liquid and ice with a bar spoon. Cocktail Kingdom’s Seamless Yarai Mixing Glass, by comparison, didn’t sit flat on the counter and wobbled with stirring, as did the lightweight French press carafes we tried.

An OXO Hawthorne strainer snugly fit the mouths of most of the mixing glasses we tested. But the spout on the Umami Mart glass is smaller and more precise than those on Cocktail Kingdom’s Yarai Mixing Glass and the W&P Mixing Glass, making straining the drink into a cocktail glass a more foolproof affair. Cocktail Kingdom’s Seamless Yarai Mixing Glass has a similar pour spout and is few dollars cheaper, but its tendency to wobble knocked it out of the running.

Spout size and shape can affect how easy it is to strain and pour from a mixing glass. We preferred the more narrow spout of the Umami Mart glass, far right. Photo: Emily Han

Though it looks delicate, the Umami Mart is made of weighty glass that’s less likely to break than something like a French press beaker. Durability is important “because you’re definitely going to break your mixing glass at some point,” says Jeffrey Morgenthaler. “It’s just a matter of when, and a heavier glass is going to live longer than a lighter one.”

At 550 mL (or 18.5ounces), enough for two drinks, we think the Umami Mart is just right for most home cocktail making. Mixing glasses generally range from 1ounces (480 mL) to 3ounces (one L), but we only tested those of comparable size to the Umami Mart glass. Morgenthaler notes that “a good mixing glass has to be large enough to hold the drink, and a good amount of ice. Smaller is definitely not better here.”

Also great for a budget mixing glass

This glass will tip more easily when mixing, and doesn’t look nearly as elegant as our top pick. But at less than a sixth of the price, it does the trick (and can also work as half of a Boston shaker setup).

A tempered pint glass such as the Anchor Hocking Pint Mixing Glass does not meet the recommendations for a wide base and straight sides. However, it is inexpensive, thick, heavy, durable, fits a Hawthorne strainer snugly, and is multipurpose if you also use it as a shaker and/or drinking glass.

The angle of the glass makes it more difficult to get a smooth and fast stir, and pouring can be less precise than a true mixing glass with a good spout. But the glass does the job and it even makes a good vessel for muddling herbs or citrus.

Mixing glass competition

The mixing glasses we tested, including two French press beakers. Photo: Emily Han

Cocktail Kingdom’s Seamless Yarai Mixing Glass is slightly bigger than the aforementioned mixing glass (550 mL versus 500 mL). It, too, has a wide base, but here the glass is lighter and it does not sit completely flat, making it wobble slightly while mixing. A Hawthorne strainer fits more snugly than the other glass, and the spout is smaller and more precise for pouring.

A couple of our experts recommended Williams-Sonoma’s version of the Yarai glass, but it is no longer available. Instead, we tested the W&P Mixing Glass now available at Williams-Sonoma (and elsewhere). Although it is sturdy, durable, and fits a Hawthorne strainer snugly, the taller height of the glass makes stirring and pouring feel a bit awkward. The glass also has a wide spout that makes pouring less precise than glasses with narrower spouts.

We considered French press carafes, such as the BonJour French Press Replacement Glass Carafe and the Bodum Spare Glass Carafe, but realized these would not work as they typically come in sizes that are too small (1ounces) or too large (3ounces) for a Hawthorne strainer. Furthermore, these inexpensive carafes are made of thin, light glass that moves and wobbles while stirring.

While functional and potentially attractive to some, we omitted scientific beakers from our review because we believe the prominent measurement marks on these glasses detract from the art of using a mixing glass to make cocktails.

Although your favorite bartender may free pour liquor right from the bottle into the shaker tin or mixing glass, measuring into a jigger offers much more accuracy (especially if you’re new to making cocktails). After retesting our original pick along with seven additional models in 201year, we continue to stand by our original recommendation of the OXO Good Grips ¼-cup Mini Angled Measuring Cup.

The OXO also helps prevent spilling and messes—a common problem with traditional two-sided jiggers—because it features a useful pour spout and has extra space in the cup above the highest measurement.

The OXO mini measuring cup’s top-down visibility, pour spout, and space above the top fill line separates it from traditional jiggers. Photo: Emily Han

Brian Van Flandern says, “while I am not normally a fan of plastic, this one is dishwasher safe and allows the user to accurately measure in both ounces, tablespoons, milliliters, and even cups. It is easy to see the measurements even in low light as the inside is marked with clear red lines…the high quality of the plastic does not emit any odors that can alter the flavor of your drink.”

The Cocktail Glass

Although people might argue about the extent a glass has on cocktail or spirit taste, there’s no denying that beautiful glassware tends to be perceived as being higher quality. Many glasses, like the martini glass, are classic and have been used with certain cocktails for decades. Others, like the more recent NEAT glass, are designed to accentuate the aromas of spirits.

The Shelf

In order to promote a well-rounded drinking experience, you should try to stock your bar with a number of these glasses. Specific glassware will show your patrons that you’re serious about the art of alcohol. Also, because many customers probably don’t have individual glass pairings at home, they’ll remember that special experience they had drinking a nice Irish Coffee out of an authentic Irish Coffee glass at your bar.

Lowball

This class is also called the Old Fashioned glass, the Rocks glass, or the Tumbler. Unlike a mixing glass, this short glass is designed so you can build the cocktail inside the glass it’s being served in. The Lowball glass has a thick base to allow ingredients to be muddled in the glass before the spirit is added. Its rim wide brim lets the drinker appreciate the drink’s aroma and the shape allows the drink to warm slowly, discretely changing the flavor profile. Avoid using this glass for vodka drinks because vodka is best cold.

Typically, this glass is used for smaller, higher-proof pours like hard spirit-based cocktails that have a limited amount of mix or straight spirits with ice (on the rocks). Originally, this glass held two ounces but now there are usually two sizes for a broader cocktail application. Now a standard Low Ball glass holds about 6-ounces and a double holds 12-16.

Highball

A Highball glass, also called the Collins glass or the Delmonico glass, is taller than an Old Fashioned glass. Each name is used to describe a variation of the basic shape: the Highball glass is shorter and wider, the Collins glass is straight and narrow, and the Delmonico is the shortest and somewhat flared. Traditionally, each glass variation is used for a different type of cocktail: the gin fizz going in a Highball, a Tom Collins in a Collins glass, and a Rickey going in a Delmonico glass. Although some mixologists abide by these rules, the important thing to note is tall and narrow shaped glasses are better for keeping a drink cold and carbonated because of the limited surface area.

The Highball glass is best used for serving highball cocktails, a family of mixed drinks that are made with an alcoholic base spirit and a larger portion of non-alcoholic mixer such as a Rum & Coke or a Gin & Tonic.

Sip This

This type of glass is for customers who want to take a shot (have a drink in one sip). Usually this drink is simply a single liquor or spirit or for a small extra strength cocktail. Shot glasses come in a variety of shapes and sizes like basic, short, tall, and fluted. You can stock your bar with any variation of these.

Cosmopolitan

A Cosmo glass has an elegant look. It resembles a martini glass but instead of a stem, it has a foot. This glass is great for Cosmopolitans (obviously) and a variety of other cocktails. The tapered design showcases the colors of the cocktail and draws the flavors and aromas to the top.

Snifter

This glass is usually used for aged brown spirits such as whiskey, brandy, and fine rums. It has a very short stem so the drinker’s hand will slowly warm the drink and a large bowl so the drink can be swirled. The mouth is shorter so the aromas are trapped, allowing the drinker to enjoy a more intense smell as they sip.

Hurricane

This glass was developed by New Orleans tavern owner Pat O’Brien in the 1940s and named after its hurricane, lamp-like shape. It’s used for a variety of drinks, specifically for tropical cocktails. The glass has a curvy and tall shape made up of a tulip-shaped bowl and a bulbous base. It also features a short stem and a small foot. This glass was originally used for the Hurricane Cocktail, a rum-based cocktail, but it is also used for cocktails like the Blue Hawaii and the Pina Colada.

Moscow Mule Mug

The Moscow Mule has been served in a copper mug since it first appeared in the the 1940s. The metal quickly takes on the cold temperature of the drink, offering a cooler sensation to the drinker. The copper and the mug handle help to keep the drink cold for a long period of time and the material is also great at deflecting the heat from the sun.

As far as the taste, the copper mug helps to enhance the individual flavors of the vodka, ginger beer, and lime. When the drink is poured, the copper begins to oxidize and slightly boosts the aroma and taste of vodka, the lime juice’s acidity is reduced and its tangy citrus notes are heightened, and the ginger beer becomes more bubbly.

Whiskey Sour

This glass is pretty much a shorter version of a wine glass. It’s used for drinks with a base spirit, a sweetener, lemon or lime juice, and traditionally egg white like a Whiskey Sour or an Amaretto Sour. The glass has a thick stem to provide stability and a narrow top to boost and intensify drink aromas.

Cordial

Considered to be an elegant glass, the cordial resembles a wine glass but it’s more delicate, thinner, and holds less alcohol. usually the cordial is used for after-dinner liqueurs or for cocktails at events. Cordials are small because they are meant to be sipped from slowly. They have large bowls that allow you to swish the liquid around to release the flavor and aroma.

Weight of the items

Most likely, you like feeling the weight of the glass as you take sips of your favorite poison. However, the glass shouldn’t be too heavy to carry from the grill to the bar. Ideally, a decanting set made of a heavy material is usually durable and won’t crack or chip easily.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Highball Glasses by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your Highball Glasses wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of Highball Glasses

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about Highball Glasses is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



Leave a comment!

Let us know what you have to say:

RECENTLY REVIEWED
Top 10 Best Whole House Power Surge Protectors Reviewed In 2018
Top 10 Best Film To Digital Converters Reviewed In 2018
Top 10 Best Electric Water Boilers and Warmers Reviewed In 2018
Top Of The Best Goblets Reviewed In 2018
Top Of The Best Daiquiri Glasses Reviewed In 2018


AFFILIATE DISCLOSURE

Some posts may contain affiliate links. best-24.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.
FOLLOW US

       
 
COPYRIGHT © 2017 · best-24.com · ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
DMCA.com Protection Status